Sedona, I Think I Love You

Sedona Valley

Sedona Valley

Sedona from the airport overlook

So far, on our extensive (sarcasm) ten day trip, if I had to stay somewhere for good it would be Sedona. The red rock formations all around the town/city (not sure which one it qualifies as, population 16,000 or so) are so beautiful. Different times of the day the shadows seem to highlight new parts of the hills.

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Sedona view from the Airport Road vortex

We spent about six days in Sedona… not on purpose, I mean it wasn’t our intention to spend so much time in one place. But the kid got sick… again. We got there on Wednesday night last week, the night that Zephyr got the ugliest case of hives I have ever seen. By the afternoon of Thanksgiving his hands and feet were swollen and he was shaking and arching his back. We spent Thanksgiving evening in the Sedona ER.  The hives were a reaction to the amoxicillin he was on for his ear infection. The swelling was a reaction to the combination of Benadryl and Advil we had him on for the hives, apparently. The ER doc gave him some low-dose steroids for a couple of days and the rash and swelling went down. I have to say I am hoping our visits to the Urgent Cares and ER are all out of the way now for the rest of our trip! And as of today I am happy to report I have a normal looking and acting one-and-a-half-year-old. The steroids made him super aggressive and quick to get frustrated. And now he knows how to say “medicine.” Poor kid. It was quite an adventure that I am thankful we seem to have left behind.

Back to the cool stuff about Sedona… we stayed at Rancho Sedona RV Park. It was low in the valley, with a creek running right through it, and large tall trees with yellow falling leaves shading the campsites. The sites were a bit close together, but not too bad. When we arrived on Wednesday night the campground was full for the Thanksgiving holiday. The shower facilities were pretty good and clean, and the laundry room was awesome! I did eight, yes eight, loads of laundry while we were there because they had four nice clean washers and six dryers. How did the three of us accumulate eight loads of laundry in the five days we had been on the road before arriving in Sedona? Mostly because I thought blankets and baby clothes that may have been washed with something other than Dreft baby detergent that I was afraid could have caused the hives (until the Doc confirmed it was a reaction to the meds on our visit to the ER).

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The cul-de-sac of campsites at Rancho Sedona… that’s us on the left, getting ready to leave

While in Sedona, after Zeph was feeling better, we got to do some fun stuff. We visited The Chapel of the Holy Cross, built in the 50s by a woman whose name I think was Margaret who worked with Frank Lloyd Wright to design the chapel. She was a sculptor and the church was her brainchild, he was the architect who designed it. Chris, being raised Catholic, did the Sacrament of the Holy Water thing at the door (where you dip your finger in the blessed water and make the sign of the cross in front of you) for him and Z, then we watched an eight year old kid walk up to the Holy Water and wash his hands in it. It was very funny but we kept from laughing outloud. I figure God thought it was pretty funny, too.

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Chris and Zeph in the entrance of the Chapel

Sedona is full of tourists, and full of baby boomer yuppies and hippies, and some strange combination of yuppy-hippies. There are two natural markets in Sedona, on the same street about four blocks away from one another. I didn’t see any regular grocery stores there. The city seems to be very strict with its color schemes, even the McDonalds arches were a seafoam green instead of yellow. I liked the way the architecture seemed to blend into and be part of the natural landscape.

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This statue outside of one of the natural markets was entitled “Merlin.” I think it looks like Poseidon if he was land-locked.

I went to one of the two natural markets. How did I choose? I went to the first one I passed. While perusing the aisles (Zeph was back at the RV napping while Chris worked) I munched on a frozen rice ice cream sandwich thing I picked up in the frozen section, as I would do back at home at Whole Foods or Mother’s or any other market or grocery store in Cali. I noticed people, employees and fellow shoppers, shooting me dirty looks while I pushed my cart and ate my treat. I looked around for signs that said “please don’t eat the merchandise while in the store” but didn’t see anything. Honestly I still don’t know what the looks were all about. Maybe I went to the locals-only natural market instead of the tourist one.

Our friends Molly and Alonzo came to visit us while we were in Sedona. They live in Phoenix and made the drive up to do dinner with us. We all drove to one of the newage “vortexes” in town. Had to climb a rock to get to it. And once we were there, we felt… nothing. Well that’s not true I guess. Molly said she felt peaceful and relaxed. I felt scared that Zeph was gonna tumble down the rock.

The five of us went to dinner at Elote Cafe, a mexican restaurant we found on Yelp. It had five of five stars with like 400-something reviews so I knew it would be good. We had to wait awhile, and the place didn’t look too special, but the food was worth the wait! I had carnitas… the pork fell apart with my fork and the red sauce it sat in added much flavor. We all shared the corn appetizer (I guess elote means “corn on the cob” in Spanish), it was like spicy creamed corn to dip your chips in. YUM! We skipped dessert at the restaurant and made s’mores in the RV over the stove back at the campsite. Zephyr loved “Moyee” and “Yosh” (somehow that was what he heard and said for Alonzo’s name) and is still talking about them everyday.

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on our way up to the vortex

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view from the top of the vortex

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the boys

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the girls

By Sunday, Zephyr was feeling better and we were feeling very thankful that our boy was recovering. We decided to try out a local church. Chris looked online and found a Catholic church, Saint John Vianney Parish, just up the road from our RV park. The church was really understated on the outside and even more simple on the inside, which I loved. Like they weren’t trying to prove anything or gather a congregation based on a flashy exterior or anything. They had some really cool artwork out around the building, iron sculptures of the Sacred Heart, a beautiful garden with about six pumpkins the size of those exercise balls you see at the gym that are up to your knees, and probably ten or so other interesting art displays to look at outside. I didn’t stay in the service for very long because there was a man behind us hacking and Zephyr kept saying “bless you” really loud. So Zeph and I hung out outside while Chris stayed inside for Mass.

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Airplane!

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That afternoon, we ventured up the 89A (a lovely and very scenic drive) to Slide Rock State Park. Chris had been there with his family when he was a kid and had fond memories of going down the naturally formed rock slide. Since we went in November there was no chance any of us was going in the freezing cold water (although we did see two kids and their dad just getting out… they looked like popsicles). The views around the park were a great way to close out our time in Sedona.

Sorry for all the differently sized images. I’m still figuring out which web browser is best for blogging, I started this post on Google Chrome and realized I can do a lot more (like size pics and add links) via Safari so I switched halfway through. I’ll try and be more consistent next time. Until then, safe travels friends…

  • Dad

    Wow! it was all cool. Sooooooo happy your having a great adventure. All those Sundays in Catholic church finally kicked in.
    A happy Dad.

  • Allie

    Great pictures! Thank you for updating the blog! I can’t wait to see and read more!! Love you guys!