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The Highest Point – Jonathan Dickinson State Park, FL | zephyr sunrise

The Highest Point – Jonathan Dickinson State Park, FL

A beautiful sunset at JDSP

A beautiful sunset at JDSP

After spending a week in California, we flew back to Ft Lauderdale and drove “home” to the Moho, which was parked at Jonathan Dickinson State Park just outside of Jupiter, Florida. In Chris’s tireless search of awesome places to stay, he picked up a two week cancellation at this park so we had a safe place to park the Moho while we went to Cali and a week at the spot when we got back to explore the park and surrounding area. Jonathan Dickinson State Park, or JDSP as it’s known by the locals, is a superb park with so much to see and do if you are the wilderness-loving type. There’s the Loxahatchee River that runs through the park surrounded by Bald Cypress trees housing nests for Osprey and other large birds. There are alligators and turtles all over the river, too. JDSP is just far enough out of civilization that you really feel like you are camping in the wilderness. The park has really spacious campsites, each with a firepit in the ground, a picnic table and a clothesline. The bathrooms are nice and new as well. And there’s a great visitor center at the park, I think we spent the better part of an hour in there looking at the artwork and displays about the surrounding habitats. The highest point in Southern Florida is on JDSP land… a whopping 86 feet in elevation. We walked the stairs to the top of Hobe Mountain one day after a sixteen or so mile bike ride through the park. We also took a pontoon boat ride down the Loxahatchee River to Trapper Nelson’s property, a famous man during WWII time that had extensive property along the river which he turned into a zoo and tourist trap. He was quite a handyman and built all of the buildings on his property by himself.

Bald Cypress tree on the Loxahatchee River, with an osprey nest and an osprey perched at the very top of the tree

Bald Cypress tree on the Loxahatchee River, with an osprey nest and an osprey perched at the very top of the tree

One of the days we were at JDSP we drove up to Sebastian’s Inlet, a well-known surf break around the world. Chris was especially excited about this as he hadn’t seen surfable waves since we left California. Sebastian’s Inlet is a beautiful state park, with a long fishing pier and a great little grill that just opened to eat lunch. The beach was really a nice place to hang out and watch the guys in the water. The surf break apparently has been recently modified due to an extension of the fishing pier so it’s no longer the great spot to surf, sadly. I’m guessing there were a lot of upset dudes over in eastern Florida when that happened.

The boys watching the waves at Sebastian's Inlet

The boys watching the waves at Sebastian’s Inlet

We found our local hangout spot while we were at JDSP. Just a few miles down the road was a little café called “Blondies.” How could I not like a place with that name? The small, brightly colored whimsical café is run by two sisters and I have a feeling their parents pitch in with the kitchen duties, too. They had a killer chicken pot pie, but everything we tried there in our four visits was tasty.

The cute decor in Blondies restaurant

The cute decor in Blondies restaurant

Our week at JDSP was a good recovery for us from the non-stop pace of our week at home in California. This is a park that will remain on our list of places to visit if we ever end up back in this neck of the woods again.

Our campsite at JDSP

Our campsite at JDSP